Giving the Jersey Shore a New Face with New Construction

Giving the Jersey Shore a New Face with New Construction

New construction is big business in America. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, more than half a million new homes were built in the U.S. during 2013. With a market share around 10 percent, the U.S. is the second largest construction market in the world. These numbers speak to the expansionist ideals of American citizens. We are builders, expanders, improvers. Good enough is never good enough; we want better. We want best. The state of New Jersey exemplifies this mentality. New York and New Jersey, combined, make up the largest housing market in the country, with a new home completed every 30 minutes. Even in the midst of the devastating effects of super-storm Sandy, new construction in New Jersey has seen a steady increase. In fact, there are those who see the storm-tossed shore as an opportunity, a blank-slate of sorts. Against a backdrop of ruin and rebuilding, a veritable sea of new residential construction has sprung up along the once ravaged Jersey shore. It is charge lead by those who look at the damage wrought by Sandy and see possibility. These people recognize the New Jersey shore as a fertile ground for new construction; new homes and businesses. The nearly 370,000 homes destroyed by Hurricane Sandy represent, for those with eyes on new construction, an opportunity to grow, build, and realize their dreams. The pastel painted, single story beach bungalows that were once the staple of shore towns like Ortley Beach, Long Beach Island and Ocean City are slowly being replace with spacious and luxurious dream homes and up-scale apartments; even amid the intensive reconstruction efforts. This ‘new’...
Guide to Working with an HMGP Contractor

Guide to Working with an HMGP Contractor

It has been nearly two years since hurricane Sandy made landfall on the New Jersey shore and, even now, the area is still working to restore itself. Amid efforts to fix the damage caused by the storm, several government funded measures and programs have been implemented in an effort to mitigate the damage caused by future storms. These programs aim to reduce the cost of future emergencies, both in human terms as well as in terms of dollars and cents. Chief among these ‘damage mitigation’ programs is the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP). Administered by FEMA and authorized under Section 404 of the Stafford Act, the HMGP provides grants to both local and state governments in order to implement long-term hazard mitigation measures after the declaration of a major disaster. The goal of the HMGP is to reduce the loss of life and property caused by natural disasters and to enable mitigation measures to be implemented expediently during the immediate recovery after a disaster. To work toward this goal, there are several HMGP contractors working with clients in the effected regions. The funds awarded by the HMGP may be used to fund projects completed by HMGP contractors that will reduce losses from future disasters. For example, programs that provide long-term solutions to hazard mitigation, such as elevation of a home to reduce the risk of flood damages, would fall under the blanket of efforts covered by the HMGP. In order to be awarded HMGP funding, a project’s potential savings must be more than the cost of implementing the project and must protect either private or public property that is...